This recent Apple promotion isn’t the first time you can buy a device and get a free U2 album.

This recent Apple promotion isn’t the first time you can buy a device and get a free U2 album.

(via buzz)

This VHS series of Skateboards by 5boro has some of the coolest deck designs I’ve ever seen. Brings me back to the days of watching skate videos on VHS and then trying to pull off the moves on my own board.

This VHS series of Skateboards by 5boro has some of the coolest deck designs I’ve ever seen. Brings me back to the days of watching skate videos on VHS and then trying to pull off the moves on my own board.

The Renaissance of Music Collecting

Marc Ruxin, the COO of Rdio, writes about the shift in the way we purchase  and consume music.

In the end surely something was lost when the act of physical collecting disappeared. The era of “High Fidelity” is largely over. The Jack Blacks who man the counters of dusty record stores are gone. The smell of new vinyl is restricted to purists, and the hand printed zines of old are all but extinct. The walls of records and CD’s have disappeared from apartments and houses, but now these private collections can be shared with the world in pint-sized digital images.

Collecting music is now a democratic, global endeavor. You don’t have to live in hip cities to access limited edition music. You don’t have to be rich to afford the pursuit. Nearly everything is available to anyone with a smartphone or computer. Music is, after all, one of the world’s most creative inventions. It is highly local, yet massively global. After years of trying to build a model where both consumers and artists win, we are finally at the beginning of something amazing. Technology has caught up, and the business of music has finally entered a safe and exciting time.

Reading the piece, you get the sense that the people at Rdio really are music nerds. It is comforting to someone like me, who went to some of the same lengths to get music back in times when it wasn’t so convenient, that the company’s executives did the same thing. I remember taking the train into DC just to go to Smash Records to find a CD by ALL or Mudhoney. Ruxin makes the point that, with the physical aspects we’ve lost, we’ve also gained a lot in convenience and accessibility, both for artists and consumers.

It’s hard to believe this floating half-pipe, created by Bob Burnquist, on Lake Tahoe, is real. It’s like something out of a dream.
- via

It’s hard to believe this floating half-pipe, created by Bob Burnquist, on Lake Tahoe, is real. It’s like something out of a dream.

- via

That was the day I made an obvious-in-retrospect but profound (at the time) realisation: I’d been living in a bubble of assumed ignorance, accepting whatever was given to me on the assumption that its creators just knew better than me. I’d been living with the belief that, if I didn’t understand or agree with how something worked, that I was missing something.

Matt Gemmell, on dissatisfaction.

Guardians of the Galaxy

The Mixtape

One could argue that the mixtape held by Peter Quill played the role of secondary maguffin in Guardians of the Galaxy. Sure, there was some fuss over this thing called the infinity stone or something like that. Starting off a lot of scenes, though, were the sounds and camera shots of the mixtape made for Peter by his mother. When the tape was taken by a prison guard while Peter was left to his incarceration, he risked his life to try and get it back before he escaped.

Peter’s attachment to the mixtape is in large part due to the fact that his mother gave it to him and he had it when he was abducted. Another part is that it’s music. No where else in the movie are we shown music like this. Put together, the tape’s meaning comes from the fact that it is music his mother picked out and put together on a cassette for her son. Anyone who has received a mixtape someone has labored over knows the importance. There is craft, there is thought, and there is love in those songs.

Doing parodies of Apple product videos is practically a cottage industry these days. The one by Ikea is well done, but I feel like there is something ironic about lampooning technology, with a traditional catalog, when some of the “real spaces” inside are computer generated.

pinnerapp:

Getting my fancy new App Store images ready for launch. “Text-above-a-screenshot” seems to be the prevailing wisdom these days. Much better than a screenshot with no context, at least. Next comes the video…

Pinner is going to be amazing on iOS 8. I don’t think it’s too much of a stretch to believe this app may change my whole media consumption workflow.

Try to imagine a world where the future of print is unclear: Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide “Click to buy” is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really.

Clay Shirky, responding to the statement that the future of print is unclear.